Fancy getting rid of those boring election opening addresses?


Those boring election opening addresses are set to become a thing of the past, thanks to a secret deal struck between political parties.

Political parties opt to scrap election speeches and pocket cash
Broadcasters have been compelled by law to run opening and closing election broadcasts, until now.
Broadcasters have been compelled by law to run opening and closing election broadcasts, until now.
Source: 1 NEWS

TVNZ and Radio New Zealand are required to broadcast the opening and closing presentations once the campaign kicks off, and on the eve of polling day.

Broadcasting Minister Amy Adams is planning a law change that will see the free television and radio slots monetised and then re-allocated to the parties by the Electoral Commission.

Source: 1 NEWS

"I think parties need to have the flexibility to work out how they want to target their message to their voters - still regulated, but with more options and more funding to get that done," she said.

The larger parties will see the lion's share, but smaller parties want the flexibility to use the funds for targeted ads and social media campaigns.

United Future's Peter Dunne says voters have stopped tuning in.

"I've done one in the middle of a bush, in a studio covered in paper on the walls so it looked like I was standing on a cloud and I've done one standing in a room in the dark."

He's welcoming the extra cash, which will be re-allocated by the Electoral Commission.

"That's six minutes more time that you can use for TV advertising or you can use the monetary equivalent for other purposes so it's quite a big deal for us."

Political marketing expert Jennifer Lees-Marshment of Auckland University said campaign advertising is increasingly going digital.

"The main trend I think you'll see in New Zealand is more targeted ads - online communication enables parties to target much more precisely because there is so much more data now that you can analyse the behaviour of people," she says.

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