Cracks in the coalition? Disagreement with NZ First forced Labour to abandon announcing details of Crown-Māori relations portfolio

The influence of Winston Peters is also believed to be putting the Prime Minister under pressure from rival MPs. Source: 1 NEWS



Kiwi cartoonist defends Aussie colleague over Serena Williams depiction - 'There's not a chance he would even contemplate doing a racist cartoon'

New Zealand Herald’s cartoonist Rod Emmerson has defended Australian cartoonist Mark Knight after his depiction of Serena Williams was labelled as ‘racist’ and ‘sexist’.

“There is not a chance he would even contemplate doing a racist cartoon,” he told 1 NEWS today.

The image made headlines around the world and has caused controversy in the US with commentators saying it is an example of Australia’s "blind racism".

He says it has been blown out of proportion.

“I think people are trying to find something that is not there.”

But he says Mr Knight should have "understood the repercussions" of his image.

“We’ve got to be very careful before we put pen to paper.”

The cartoon comes after tennis star Serena Williams made several outbursts to the umpire at the US Open final.

Emmerson says Knight is “ … very big on sportsmanship and doesn’t like people throwing ‘wobblies’.”

This dominated the 6-2 6-4 final win by Naomi Osaka at Flushing Meadows on Saturday.

Mark Knight is in hot water after his depiction of Serena Williams was labelled ‘racist’ and ‘sexist’. Source: 1 NEWS


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High number of Kiwis deported from Australia 'corrosive' to relationship

Australia's deportation of Kiwis has been "corrosive" to the trans-Tasman relationship, New Zealand's top diplomat in Australia has told a parliamentary committee in Canberra.

Appearing at the Australian government's Joint Standing Committee on Migration today, New Zealand High Commissioner Chris Seed criticised the legal processes around deporting long-term residents on character grounds and without convictions as "less than robust".

"We don't have an issue with deportation," he said.

"What we have a problem with is where they're deporting people who have effectively lived here for long periods of time ... who came here when they were two, who are essentially products of the Australian community or whose family are here."

He said tighter rules introduced in 2014 - combined with laws stripping New Zealanders of automatic residence status from 2001 - had seen the rate of Kiwis being deported increase seven-fold in three years, to the point they were being "disproportionately" penalised compared to other nationalities.

"Many of those consequences don't look like good public policy outcomes to us and they're having a corrosive impact on the otherwise strong relationship," he said.

New Zealand Foreign Affairs Ministers Winston Peters backed Mr Seed.

"We can't gild the lily here. It's a fact. Since 2001-2002, when our special relationship changed ... Things haven't been what they ought to be. But we're working positively on trying to improve that," he said.

New Zealand's coalition government has been vocal in its criticism of the deportations, with its justice minister, Andrew Little, and Australian Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton trading barbs over the matter earlier in the year.

Mr Dutton said Australia did a lot of heavy lifting for New Zealand in terms of regional security and stopping boats, and has defended the sovereign right to deport people.

New Zealand and Australian flags.
New Zealand and Australian flags. Source: istock.com

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Man with Down syndrome appeals to MPs, wants early access to KiwiSaver to visit brother and best friend overseas

"I want to do more", Tim Fairhall, a 39-year-old man who has Down syndrome, told MPs as he appealed for access to his KiwiSaver funds before age 65. 

He spoke to the Finance and Expenditure Select Committee about his goal to visit his brother and friend overseas while he was still in good health.

"I won't live as long as most people," Mr Fairhall said. "It doesn't matter how long you live, as long as you make the most of your life."

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For more on this story, watch 1 NEWS at 6pm. Source: 1 NEWS

Tim Fairhall had been working at Countdown for 14 years, and recently starred in a video made by the Retirement Commissioner's office to champion his case for early access to his KiwiSaver funds.

The money Mr Fairhall needs to travel with his mother is locked up in KiwiSaver until he turns 65, but Down syndrome means he is ageing faster than most.

He said his goal was to see his brother in Italy and his best friend in Canada.

"I have saved my money to do that.

"I have done lots of cool things in my life so far, and I want to do more."

His mother, Joan Fairhall, said her son and other people with Down syndrome had their savings "trapped" if it was invested with KiwiSaver.

"I want you do consider whether the current legislation is unfair and indeed discriminatory, whether it kidnaps and holds on to, and uses the savings of people in this category, but there is just no mechanism for them to get it out and use it fairly for themselves."

Tim Fairhall and his mum argue the rules as they stand discriminate against people like him. Source: 1 NEWS

She said previously, "If Tim survives till he's 65, and it's quite likely he will, he'll be a really old man then - the equivalent of about 90". 

For more on this story, watch 1 NEWS at 6. 

Tim Fairhall wants to use his savings to travel while he is still in good health. Source: 1 NEWS


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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte reacts to threats to force him from power

Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte has reacted to alleged threats by his opponents to force him from power.

Speaking to state television today, Duterte said: "If the armed forces think that I am not competent, that I am not qualified to be sitting here as president ... it's up to you," Duterte said. "You want another president? Fine."

Opposition politicians said Duterte's TV appearance, which lasted more than an hour, should have focused on growing public concern over inflation, which hit a nine-year high last month, rice shortages and poverty.

A powerful typhoon churning over the Pacific is also forecast to lash the country's agricultural north later this week.

Duterte attempted to explain the legal offensive he has launched against opposition Senator Antonio Trillanes IV.

He linked Trillanes' political group to an alleged plot to oust him, and said he has ordered the release of intelligence provided by a foreign government about the alleged plan.

Duterte's decision to withdraw a 2011 amnesty granted to Trillanes, a former navy officer who joined past mutinies, has forced the senator to seek refuge in the Senate, where he has been marooned for a week and gained wide media coverage.

Concerns have been raised that Duterte's moves may undermine judicial independence and that the political impasse may ignite restiveness among troops in a country with a recent history of military uprisings.

Military chief of staff General Carlito Galvez Jr. warned troops over the weekend "not to meddle or take part in partisan politics".

Opposition politicians said Duterte's TV appearance should have focused on growing public concern over inflation. Source: Associated Press


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