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Christchurch chippy bringing te reo to the table with kīnaki on your kai

The use of Te Reo Māori has probably never been more prevalent on screen or radio, but there are still plenty of places where it's breaking new ground.

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It's fairly rare to see te reo used on mainstream food products. Source: Seven Sharp

It's fairly rare to see Māori-branded mainstream food products, so a Christchurch business has decided to change that, starting with an iconic Kiwi condiment.

Anton Matthews has been dishing up fish and chips with a side of te reo since he opened his doors.

Fush, Wigram's local chippy, is a proud kaitiaki of Te Reo Māori, and he takes every opportunity to further educate his customers with his customs.

Now he's going bigger, teaming up with Barkers of Heratini (Geraldine) to release an old Kiwi favourite with a new look - and a name that he hopes will catch on.

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Fush encourages the use of Te Reo Maori on its premises, so owner Anton Matthews has taken his passion for the language to a whole new level. Source: 1 NEWS

At Fush, you get kīnaki with your kai, rather than tomato sauce.

"The feedback has been overwhelmingly positive," Matthews told TVNZ1's Seven Sharp.

"There's always going to be a couple of people that don't always like what you're up to, but the vast majority have been really positive. We're really excited."

Matthews says nothing would make him happier than seeing other food producers following suit, adding te reo to their products.

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Fush owner Anton Matthews has had such a big response from around NZ he’s considering taking classes on the road. Source: 1 NEWS

"Part of my mission in life is to try and get Te Reo Māori in as many places as we can, sometimes that's in the really big things as well as the little small things," he says.

"Although it seems like a small thing, a bottle of tomato sauce, for my children, when they open the fridge and they see Te Reo Māori on a bottle of tomato sauce, or they walk up the aisles at the supermarket and they see Te Reo Māori, that really lifts te mana o te reo - the status of the language."