Avocado price drop may be on the way as Kiwi orchardists plant up

Good news for avocado lovers - prices could drop eventually as more homegrown avocados come on to the market.

Jen Scoular of New Zealand Avocados says nurseries are rushed off their feet providing saplings.
Source: 1 NEWS

The group marketing New Zealand avocados says rapid industry growth should help ease supply pressures here.

Representatives of the largest avocado growing nations are visiting New Zealand this week for an international industry conference.

Avocado New Zealand chief executive Jen Scoular said the focus of the meeting was to look at the future of the industry from a global perspective.

New Zealand does not import any avocados, relying on what growers here supply, which can put pressure on prices of the seasonally grown fruit.

In May, Statistics New Zealand reported a small harvest had resulted in a record 37 percent rise in the average price of a 200g avocado to $5.06, compared to $3.69 in April. There was even a spate of avocado thefts.

Mexico, Peru and Chile have shown interest in supplying avocados to New Zealand.

Ms Scholar said while she understood those discussions were ongoing, the amount of avocados being grown here was increasing rapidly and that should help ease prices and supply in the future.

"We have got 20 percent [more] new plantings of avocado orchards, particularly in Northland," Ms Scholar said.

"The additional plantings of avocadoes in New Zealand will mean we will have a lot bigger supply, and that may well satisfy the consumers in New Zealand in terms of their increasing love of avocados," she said.

- Reporting by RNZ's Maja Burry

Radionz.co.nz



Most watched: Meet the Iraqi immigrant family learning Te Reo Maori - 'We have a responsibility to speak the language'

This story was first published on Thursday September 13.

Mariam Arif and her whānau are immersing themselves in te reo, as a way to feel more at home. Source: Seven Sharp

This last year has seen the number of people wanting to learn the Māori language skyrocket.

From the cape to the bluff - people are queueing up to get into Te Reo Māori classes.

One of those is an Iraqi immigrant and her whānau - who have immersed themselves in the Māori language.

"We are living on this land so we have a responsibility to speak the language of this land," Mariam Arif told Seven Sharp.

She's been living here for 20 years but has only been learning Te Reo Māori for two of those.

"When I started, I didn't really like talking, but I didn't give up and stop, didn't get shy and didn't get lazy and now I'm a lot better."

Ms Arif can speak three languages, English, Arabic and Te Reo Māori.

With her family also getting in on the act, she has plenty of people to help practice her newest language.


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Auckland Girl Guides and Brownies 'shocked' to learn women had to fight for the vote 125 years ago

A group of Auckland Girl Guides and Brownies are learning about the biggest women's rights fight in New Zealand history, days out from the 125th anniversary of Kiwi women winning the right to vote.

There's a big celebration next week. It was September 19 1893 that New Zealand became the first self-governing country in the world in which all women had the right to vote in parliamentary elections.

Te Atatu Girl Guide Leah Kim, 10, told Seven Sharp it really upset her to learn that women didn't get to vote until the law was changed 125 years ago.

"I didn't understand why men just got to vote and not women," she said.

Girl Guide Leader Nicola Igusa said when the girls realised that women didn't have the same rights "they feel really shocked and surprised and say 'why? why not?. That's really unfair'. Small children are really focused on fairness, so they really get it".

Kate Sheppard had tried and failed to change the law with petitions in both 1891 and 1892, but she refused to give up.

She organised 'the monster petition' of 31,872 signatures - 25 per cent of all adult women, whose collective voices created a mammoth paper protest, 274 metres long.

A new Electoral Act was passed  and in the General Election that followed a whopping 85 per cent of New Zealand women registered to vote, did so.

Next week will be 125 years since New Zealand women won the right to vote. Source: Seven Sharp


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TODAY'S
FEATURED STORIES

Could the humble raffle draw be the solution to New Zealand's housing crisis?

A homeowner in the UK struggling to sell their property has come up with a novel way to get shift of it that could also take off in New Zealand.

The owner of a 1760 Georgian heritage-listed property is raffling off their multi-million-dollar home with tickets costing $25 a pop.

Seven Sharp looks at whether raffling houses could be the solution to New Zealand's housing crisis in the video above.

In the UK, a 1760 Georgian heritage-listed property is being raffled – could it happen here? Source: Seven Sharp


Powerball struck for fourth time in a month as winner scoops $7.2 million

Powerball was struck for the fourth time in a month tonight when a punter from Silverdale north of Auckland scooped $7.2 million.

The prize is made up of $7 million from Powerball First Division and $200,000 from Lotto First Division.

The winning ticket was sold at Pak'nSave Silverdale in Silverdale. 

It's the fourth time in as many weeks that Powerball First Division has been struck, following on from late-August’s $5 million Powerball win by a Christchurch couple. Those lucky winners plan to use their winnings to go on the trip of a lifetime to Italy. 

Four other Lotto players will also be celebrating tonight after each winning $200,000 with Lotto First Division. 

The winning Lotto tickets were sold at Kelson General Store in Lower Hutt, Richmond Night N Day in Nelson, Ilam New World in Christchurch and New World Gore.  

Meanwhile, Strike Four was won by two players in Waikato and Tauranga, who each take home $50,000. Both those winning Strike tickets were sold on MyLotto.

Lotto Powerball (file picture).
Lotto Powerball (file picture). Source: Lotto


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