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Auckland Grammar calls in leading sex educator to talk to students about the dangers of porn

Pornography has been added to the curriculum at one of the country's leading secondary schools.

The school argues that pornography is a mental health and wellbeing issue. Source: 1 NEWS

Auckland Grammar has called in leading sexuality educator Maree Crabbe after it found that porn could be causing damage to its students.

Headmaster Tim O'Connor says staff and parents were also invited along.

"Just firstly to say actually are you aware of the addictive behaviour of porn and its accessibility and then be able to say to young men, can you tell the difference between real world behaviour and what a porn world behaviour is," he said.

Mr O'Connor says it is now part of their regular classroom conversations, with pornography being a mental health and well-being issue.

A group of 15 year-old students spoke to 1 NEWS about their experiences of the programme, after their parents gave permission to talk.

"Porn videos quite often show male dominance in the videos as she was telling us, putting the girls in all these painful different positions, and that’s not what it should be like in real life," says Ollie.

"The thought of getting to that stage where you become reliant on it and it becomes a need, that whole idea really scares me," says Richard.

Headmaster Tim O'Connor points to research showing that 60 percent of boys access porn on a weekly basis.

Student Lockie says he now realises that can have dangerous consequences.

"People can't actually have intercourse properly and people struggle to actually enjoy time with their wife or girlfriend or partner," he says.

There's no specific Government funding for the health impacts of porn.

The chief censor wants the Government to implement a comprehensive approach that includes education and discussion, while Family First wants a Parliamentary inquiry.

Prime Minister Bill English says he is happy with the status quo.

"In the end people make choices. We want them to make good choices and if the school is taking the responsibility of trying to shape young people's choices I think that's a good thing," says Mr English.