Almost half of Kiwis do not support Te Reo Maori classes being compulsory in schools, study suggests

A 1 NEWS Vote Compass report based on 175,689 respondents suggests almost half do not support compulsory Te Reo Maori in schools, while just over a third do support it.

The report posed the statement: "All children in New Zealand should have to learn Maori language in school" and asked them to choose their response: strongly disagree, somewhat disagree, neutral, somewhat agree or strongly agree.

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

The data shows 47 per cent of respondents either strongly disagreed or somewhat disagreed with compulsory te reo in school, while 37 per cent strongly or somewhat agreed - 16 per cent were neutral.

Broken down by vote intention, Maori Party voters were the most likely to agree while Act Party voters largely disagreed strongly.

Females respondents were more like to support compulsory te reo than males, and generally the older the respondent the less they agreed with it.

Those with higher levels of education were more likely to agree with compulsory te reo, and generally those with right-wing political ideas disagreed while those on the left supported it.

People from the South Island were slightly more inclined to disagree than those living on the North Island.

It is currently Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori - Maori Language Week.

About the methodology of the survey:

"Developed by a team of social and statistical scientists from Vox Pop Labs, Vote Compass is a civic engagement application offered in New Zealand exclusively by TVNZ. The findings are based on 175,689 respondents who participated in Vote Compass from August 20, 2017 to September 08, 2017. Unlike online opinion polls, respondents to Vote Compass are not pre-selected. Similar to opinion polls, however, the data are a non-random sample from the population and have been weighted in order to approximate a representative sample. Vote Compass data have been weighted by gender, age, education, religion, occupation, and Mãori descent to ensure the sample’s composition reflects that of the actual population of New Zealand according to census data and other population estimates."

Results:

Statement: "All children in New Zealand should have to learn Maori language in school"

From left: Strongly disagree, somewhat disagree, neutral, somewhat agree, strongly agree

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools
Results from a Vote Compass study on compulsory Te Reo Maori lessons in schools Source: Supplied

Source: 1 NEWS



Winston Peters says he'd only form government with Labour if they reveal tax plans first

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters has ruled out forming any government with Labour after the election until he's told the party's tax plans.

Jacinda Ardern has repeatedly said Labour will establish a working tax group if elected and would wait for their findings before making a final judgement on any tax plans.

Mr Peters addressed the issue on RNZ's Morning Report today, saying: "The public need to know the full ambit of this tax policy that Labour is talking about".

"If you are able to rule out what you are not going to take up, then surely you know what you will adopt in the future.

"I can not deal with negotiations on the basis of 'some time in the future you may well know'," Mr Peters said.

Mr Peters maintained he would not let the issue go after the election if coalition talks took place between the two parties.

"We would still need to know, with great specificity, where you are going to go with this tax policy.

"Otherwise we're signing up to a pig in a poke," he said.

Mr Peters was quick to point out this wasn't just a negotiating tactic he was employing, instead putting the emphasis on transparency to the voters.

"If they get away with not telling the public, nevertheless I'd want to know because we'd want to know what we're buying here and what we're getting ourselves in to, because it could be a calamity."

Ms Ardern says she has always been up-front about Labour's tax working group, telling reporters yesterday: "So I suspect most people knew that work would be undertaken."

This comes as the NZ First leader promised more sweeteners for SuperGold Card users. Source: 1 NEWS

TODAY'S
FEATURED STORIES

'Horrific bang!' – witness rushes to rescue driver and his dog in Christchurch railway crossing crash

A man and his dog have narrowly escaped a crash that ended with his van sideways on a railway crossing in Christchurch this morning.

Emergency services were called to the intersection of Antigua Street and Hazeldean Road around 9:30am.

The managing director of Canterbury Powder Coaters, Blair Trillo, said he rushed to the drivers aid after hearing a "horrific bang".

It is not known how the crash occurred.

There were no injuries.

Emergency services were called to the intersection of Antigua Street and Hazeldean Road around 9:30am. Source: 1 NEWS