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Woody Allen, Mia Farrow docuseries a lesson on how society handles sex abuse cases, filmmakers say

One of the filmmakers behind a new docuseries about Woody Allen and Mia Farrow's relationship and allegations that he sexually abused their daughter, Dylan, said she bristles at reports that their project is one-sided.

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Directors Amy Ziering and Kirby Dick outline the intricacies of Allen v. Farrow. Source: AAP

"Sometimes the truth is both sides," said Amy Ziering.

"There's been this real creep into social discourse and it's really pernicious and it's really damaging where like, everything has a different side. No, actually, climate change is real and if you think there's another side to it, there's really powerful interests that want you to think that, but that's not the truth. And it's same with all of these crimes where we hear, 'Well, you know,' well, think about it.

"Would the criminal really want to talk about it? And what if he talked about it? Would he tell you the truth?"

The filmmakers say they requested an interview with Allen multiple times and he never responded. Mia Farrow, Dylan Farrow and Ronan Farrow are all interviewed on camera. They also play home videos recorded by Mia.

Allen has long denied sexually abusing Dylan. In a 2020 memoir, he said he "never did anything to her that could be even misconstrued as abusing her; it was a total fabrication from start to finish."

The series also plays excerpts of the audiobook recording of Allen's memoir.

"Our films aren't about bringing one person to justice," added Ziering.

"It's about all of us reflecting more on the systems that enable these crimes to be committed, the ways that we all are complicit, wittingly or unwittingly, and in in enabling them and overlooking them and how we all can move forward to change that."

Two separate investigations were conducted in the 1990s and Allen wasn't charged. Dylan Farrow has maintained that she was abused and her allegations have been embraced in the #MeToo era.

"Dylan has been telling her story so consistently for so long, over 30 years, right, and that's really a testament to her and to her courage. And as we show in the film, she came forward again as an adult years before MeToo. And so in some ways, she is one of the important precursors of MeToo coming forward. And I think she contributed to, you know, what happened eventually in 2017."

Allen v. Farrow premieres on February 21 (February 22 NZT) on HBO. It debuts on HBO Max the following day.

The Associated Press reached out to Allen for a statement on the project and his spokesperson said there was no comment.