Watch: Anika Moa tries out some impersonations on British comedian Catherine Tate

If you've heard the catchphrase, "Am I bothered? Does my face look bothered?" you'll probably know the work of award winning comedian Catherine Tate.

The British comedian's just popped over to New Zealand to announce her first live stage-show down under.

TVNZ1's Seven Sharp sent self-confessed Tate fan-girl Anika Moa along to find out more.

Find out if Moa's impressions of Tate's characters impressed the comedian in the video above.

Tate is touring New Zealand for the first time. Source: Seven Sharp

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'Instead of a car, a newborn baby' - William Shatner takes dig at Elon Musk, bizarrely suggests sending baby Neve to space

William Shatner has made an odd suggestion to help improve the country's space programme - sending baby Neve Gayford into space.

The comments come after the Star Trek actor helped open Rocket Lab's new factory alongside Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in Auckland today.

In a dig at SpaceX founder Elon Musk, who put a car inside a rocket which was sent into orbit, Shatner said sending Ms Ardern's newborn baby would yield a greater payload.

"The Prime Minister has a baby, so why don't we put the baby as a payload. Get the baby up there, protect it - and, of course, bring the baby back home - but think how much better New Zealand's space programme would be," he said.

"Instead of a car, a newborn baby. What a wonderful place to be - on the cutting edge of this technology."

The Star Trek actor gave a very odd suggestion to help improve the country’s space programme Source: 1 NEWS

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One charge dismissed against Harvey Weinstein amid concerns detective coached witness to remain silent

Prosecutors in New York City abandoned part of their sexual assault case against Harvey Weinstein today after evidence surfaced that a lead police detective coached a witness to keep quiet when she raised doubts about the veracity of one of the allegations.

Weinstein, 66, looked on as a judge agreed to dismiss the lone charge related to Lucia Evans, who helped spark the #MeToo movement a year ago when she told The New Yorker that the Hollywood mogul had forced her to perform oral sex in 2004 when she was a college student and fledgling actress.

Weinstein's lawyer, Benjamin Brafman, unsuccessfully urged Judge James Burke to deep-six the whole case, telling him: "The integrity of these proceedings has been compromised."

The bulk of the prosecution case remains intact, with Weinstein still facing five charges over allegations that he raped an unidentified woman in his Manhattan hotel room in 2013 and performed a forcible sex act on a different woman in 2006. A conviction on the most serious charges could put him in prison for the rest of his life.

Weinstein denies all allegations of nonconsensual sex.

The turn of events, which had been simmering for weeks in closed-door meetings and sealed court documents, enraged Evans' lawyer, who took to the courthouse steps to blast Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. for walking away from her client. Evans told the truth and never misled investigators, lawyer Carrie Goldberg said.

"Let me be clear: the decision to throw away my client's sexual assault charges says nothing about Weinstein's guilt or innocence. Nor does it reflect on Lucia's consistent allegation that she was sexually assaulted with force by Harvey Weinstein," Goldberg said outside the courthouse.

"It only speaks volumes about the Manhattan DA's office and its mishandling of my client's case."

Prosecutor Joan Illuzzi-Orbon insisted in court that the rest of the case is strong and said the district attorney's office was looking into the possibility of bringing additional charges.

"In short, your honor, we are moving full steam ahead," she said.

Detective Nicholas DiGaudio, who was one of two investigators who escorted Weinstein out of a police station and into court after his May arrest, is now embroiled in an internal police department investigation and has been thrown off the case. Chief of Detectives Dermot Shea said today that the department takes seriously the allegations against him.

Prosecutors said in a letter unsealed after today's hearing that they learned weeks ago that a woman who was with Evans the night she first met Weinstein at a restaurant had given DiGaudio a contradictory account of what happened, but that the detective had urged her to keep quiet, telling her "less is more."

The woman, prosecutors said, told the detective in February that Weinstein had offered them money to flash their breasts during the restaurant encounter.

They initially declined, but the woman said that Evans later told her she had gone ahead and exposed herself to the film producer in a hallway. Goldberg disputed that.

The woman also told the detective that sometime after an office meeting where Evans alleged Weinstein forced her to perform oral sex, she suggested what happened was consensual, according to the letter. Weinstein had promised to get her an acting job if she agreed to perform oral sex, and she agreed, it said.

According to the witness, who was not named in the letter, Evans had been drinking and "appeared to be upset, embarrassed and shaking" when she recounted the story.

Prosecutors also disclosed that they had discovered a draft email that Evans had written three years ago to a man who is now her husband that "describes details of the sexual assault that differ from the account" she provided to investigators.

A message left on a phone DiGaudio used in the past wasn't returned. The union for New York City police detectives didn't return a message.

Brafman said he believed Evans had lied both to the grand jury and to The New Yorker about her encounter with Weinstein and suggested she be prosecuted for perjury.

"This is an attack on the fundamental integrity of the grand jury process," Brafman said. "If you have a person willing to commit perjury in the grand jury, that is as serious as the crime of sexual assault because it undermines the fairness of the process for all of us."

The developments in Weinstein's case today capped a tough six-day stretch for the #MeToo movement, bookended by Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation amid decades-old allegations that he had committed sexual misconduct. But victim advocates didn't see it as a setback.

"This is so much larger than any singular case," Kristen Houser of the National Sexual Violence Resource Center said. "Weinstein may have been the snowball that started the avalanche, but the ability of any one perpetrator being held accountable or getting away with it doesn't alter the national outrage."

The New Yorker, in a statement, said it stands by its reporting and fact-checking process and that "any assertion by lawyers for Harvey Weinstein that The New Yorker had information that contradicted Lucia Evans's account is patently incorrect."

Vance has already been fiercely criticised for declining to prosecute Weinstein when an Italian model accused him of grabbing her breasts in 2015. At the time, Vance cited a lack of supporting evidence, despite the existence of a clandestinely made recording of Weinstein discussing the episode with the woman.

In the months after The New York Times and The New Yorker began publishing stories about Weinstein's interactions with women, activists pressured Vance to bring charges as dozens of people came forward with claims of sexual misconduct against him.

DiGaudio and other police officials poured on the pressure, saying publicly that they believed they had gathered ample evidence to make an arrest.

The Associated Press does not identify alleged victims of sexual assaults unless they come forward publicly, as Evans has done.
Weinstein is free on $1.5 million bail and is due back in court December 20.

FILE - In this July 9, 2018 file photo, Harvey Weinstein is escorted in handcuffs to a courtroom in New York. The #MeToo movement has sent dozens of once-powerful men in Hollywood into exile, but it has yet to put many of them in handcuffs or courtrooms. Weinstein has been charged with sexual assault in New York and Bill Cosby has been sent to prison in Pennsylvania in the year since stories on Weinstein in The New York Times and The New Yorker set off waves of revelations of sexual misconduct in Hollywood. But those two central figures have been exceptions. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
Harvey Weinstein is escorted in handcuffs to a courtroom in New York. Source: Associated Press

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Inter-generational dance project explores women's movement in New Zealand

Dancers as young as 12 have teamed up with those as wise as 80, to create a dance exploring the women's movement in New Zealand.

The inter-generational project called "RESPECT: Perspectives in Motion" will be performed at Auckland's War Memorial Museum this weekend.

It's a response to a current exhibition, called "Are we there yet? Women and Equality in Aotearoa".

The collaborative performance has been organised by the New Zealand Dance Company, featuring ladies from their seniors dance classes and students taking part in their spring school holiday dance programme.

Professional dancer and tutor Katie Rudd says the two groups "bring some really unique energies and wisdom and experiences to the work".

"It's exploring the ideas around supporting and embracing all individuals in society."

"I wouldn't say it's a strong feminist movement of anything, it's more about looking at creating everyone as equals," she said.

Tutors have worked with the dancers taking part to choreograph the piece, incorporating a range of ideas and personal experiences.

"We had to write a letter to our younger self and then we took some key words out of that and created moves" said Felicity Learnan, one of the senior dancers.

"It's amazing how you can make the dance so meaningful."

Gail Alex, another senior dancer, says the project's been challenging.

"I'm far out of my comfort zone doing this, but getting more and more out of it as we go along" she said.

Their public performance will take place in the atrium of Auckland's War Memorial Museum, at 1pm on Saturday.

The international creation will be performed at Auckland Museum. Source: 1 NEWS


Australian singer Shannon Noll pleads guilty to drug charge

Singer Shannon Noll has pleaded guilty to cocaine possession in Sydney.

The 43-year-old's lawyer, Bryan Wrench, entered the plea at Sutherland Local Court today, while Noll sat outside the courtroom.

Mr Wrench asked that the charge of possessing a prohibited drug immediately proceed to sentence.

Police caught Noll with 0.53 grams of cocaine in a clear, resealable bag, according to the amended facts.

The Australian Idol 2003 runner-up arrived at court, in the rain, wearing a blue suit and tie.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - JULY 22:  Shannon Noll performs on stage at The Ettamogah Hotel on July 22, 2017 in Sydney, Australia.  (Photo by Matt Blyth/Getty Images)
Shannon Noll performs on stage at The Ettamogah Hotel. Source: Getty