Maori artist's song This Is Me wins Golden Globe for best Film Original Song

A Maori artist's song, This Is Me, has won the Golden Globe Award for Best Film Orignal Song.

Keala Settle's track was created for the film The Greatest Showman.

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Settle is a Broadway star who is of Maori descent. She still has family living in New Zealand.

Today at the awards, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul accepted the award and thanked Settle for her work.

"Keala performed the song and her story inspired the song...so we thank you," they said.

More Golden Globes video:



Watch: Meet the breakout te reo music stars Maimoa Music as they drop hot new single

How many pop hits can you name that are sung entirely in Māori?

Moana and the Moahunters were the trailblazers, but more recently Maimoa Music had a breakout hit with their song Wairua.

It stayed on the charts for weeks and the video has over 5.9 million views.

Seven Sharp’s Tamati Rimene-Sproat found out what motivates the group to stay true to Te Reo Māori in the video above.

Maimoa Music were one of the breakout bands of 2017 with their song Wairua. Source: Seven Sharp


Watch: Do you agree with older viewer that this Old El Paso advert is 'horrifying' and promotes violence?

An advert for Old El Paso tortillas has drawn criticism from an older viewer who labelled the Danny Trejo fronted commercial as "very disturbing" and "horrifying".

Trejo is known for portraying tough guy characters on film and screen, in the Old El Paso advert he pulls a tablecloth from a dinner table and says "amigos, it's time to ditch the dull dinners".

His demeanour has led to a complaint being put forward to the Advertising Standards Authority by a 70-year-old who wants the advert removed from air.

An advert featuring has been described as "menacing", "horrifying" and "very disturbing" in a complaint to the (ASA).

"It appears to me that had the man been home in a setting he may have been on drugs e.g. methamphetamine," the complaint says.

"It doesn't promote community standards for dining together; rather it suggests it could be a violent occasion to be avoided.

"It promotes violence, undue aggression, and menacing or horrifying elements likely to disturb and may encourage anti-social behaviour."

"As a 70-year-old I found it very disturbing."

After looking at the complaint the ASA ruled that the advert relies on humour and no one else in the commercial is concerned with the actions of Trejo's character.

The ASA concluded the ad was unlikely to support or encourage unacceptable violence or cause serious or widespread offence.

Therefore, the Chair ruled there were no grounds for the complaint to proceed. 

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Aussie PM Scott Morrison apologises and removes online video over inappropriate song lyrics

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has deleted a parody video from his social media accounts after discovering the hip-hop song used in the footage contains explicit and sexually charged lyrics.

The 11-second clip from question time in the federal Parliament on Thursday showed MPs raising their arms to the 1999 track Be Faithful by US rapper Fatman Scoop.

The suggestive lyrics were not included in the brief video, but the full song contains six uses of the word f***.

The clip was posted to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram on Thursday before being taken down.

"The full lyrics of the song used in my earlier video from QT today were just not OK. When I found out, I asked the team to take it down. Apologies," Mr Morrison tweeted.

Despite the video being deleted from all of Mr Morrison's accounts, social media users retained the clip and it's still easily accessible on Twitter.


New play based on The Simpsons opens in Auckland

A new show has opened in Auckland, and it’s based on The Simpsons.

Called Mr Burns, the Silo Theatre play features some well-known Kiwi performers, such as Ana Scotney from The Breaker Upperers and Joel Tobeck whose list of work includes Sons of Anarchy and Shortland Street.

Written by Anne Washburn, the story begins with an untold apocalyptic event, and how the recollection of the famous Simpsons episode Cape Feare - where Sideshow Bob tries to kill Bart - helps bind those left alive.

The message is centred around the importance of storytelling and holding onto cultural traditions.

"Something can grow into something bigger, as stories get told and things get changed," said director and life-long The Simpsons fan Oliver Driver.

"What binds us together are stories, legend, myths and the beginning of them and how they can shift and change over time, and the necessity of stories for our survival," Scotney said.

The play has previously been done in the US, UK and Australia, but this is the first time it’s been performed for a New Zealand audience.

Tobeck, who hasn’t done any theatre work for 15 years, says the show is the full package.

"It has the drama, the music, the dance and the grandness of The Simpsons,” he said.

The show is on at Q Theatre in Rangatira until the end of the month.

Mr Burns is on at the Q Theatre in Rangatira and features some well-known Kiwi performers including Ana Scotney from The Breaker Upperers and Joel Tobeck from Sons of Anarchy. Source: 1 NEWS